QBCC levels the playing field for those who lodge financial information

1 June 2021

More than 100 builders, pool installers, painters, air-conditioning services, bricklayers, cabinetmakers, plasterers, concreters, plumbers, roofers and landscapers have had their licences suspended for failing to submit their financial information to the State’s building industry watchdog.

The majority of licensees in the building and construction sector have complied with tough new laws requiring all building and construction licensees to prove their financial viability.

The laws were introduced by the Queensland Government in January 2019 in an effort to reduce insolvencies and better protect consumers and subcontractors.

The licensees are now required to submit financial information annually to the Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC).

QBCC Commissioner Brett Bassett said the deadline for these licensees to provide the building industry watchdog with their information was 31 December 2020.

“It’s important that the QBCC ensures a level playing field for those who do the right thing and who have lodged their financial information as required by law,” Mr Bassett said.

“After numerous opportunities to submit, and following a thorough regulatory process, the QBCC had no choice but to suspend a total of 136 licences last month,” he said.

“If the majority of licensees can meet their obligations by lodging, it’s appropriate that we take this action against those who have failed to comply with these important requirements.

“These licensees have an allowable annual turnover of between $800,001 and $30 million, they are medium to large companies with a considerable footprint.”

Mr Bassett said all of these businesses were required to stop work, under their licence suspension, and if they continued to work they could risk further regulatory action. The licensees must submit their financial information for the suspension to be lifted.

“In a building boom like we’re seeing, it’s imperative that when a homeowner hires a builder or a tradie, they know that the job will be completed,” he said.

“We see the devastation of company collapses and the impact they have on consumers who are left with incomplete projects or homes, we also see the devastation insolvencies have on subcontractors who are owed money.

“QBCC staff handle monies-owed complaints and non-completion complaints every day. These complaints are often against companies that won’t pay their invoices or don’t have the resources to finish a project.

“It’s hard for all involved, and is the reason behind the QBCC taking strong regulatory action to weed out those who don’t want to play by the rules.”

The full list of licensees who have been suspended is on the QBCC’s website.
 

Contact: 

139 333