construction

Round two of the QBCC's educational shows hits the road

On 1 November, the QBCC is launching the second round of our 2017 educational Tradie Tours, with technical advice and legislative reforms the hot topics for discussion.

Feedback from those who attended the first round of Tradie Tours in June indicated a desire for more information on technical issues and changes within the industry.

The QBCC has listened, and the second round will feature information on a costly and common defective work complaint, the installation of timber and aluminium joinery.  

No complacency when it comes to electrical safety

Electrical risks in ceiling spaces

The recent electrical shock of a plumber in the Cairns area is a reminder to all plumbers and contractors about the need to be vigilant when it comes to electrical safety.

In this instance, the plumber was about to enter the ceiling space of a property after he had removed a section of the roof.

He dropped a tool into the ceiling space and while trying to retrieve it, appears to have come into contact with exposed electrical wires.

Get construction sites ready for storm season

Get ready for storm season

Storm season is on its way! We urge all licensed contractors to prepare your building sites for potential severe weather conditions.

We strongly suggest taking precautions on your worksites to avoid the risk of injury, damage and costs associated with storms and cyclones.

It's a good idea to:

Licence lending is not allowed

QBCC licence cards

The QBCC would like to remind licensees to not engage in licence lending or licence borrowing.

Licence lending can include:

  • providing another person with your licence details so they can undertake or contract for work; or
  • engaging a person who is not an employee of your company to act as a nominee supervisor for your company.

Licence borrowing is where an unlicensed person, or a person who holds a licence for a different type of work, pretends to hold a licence for work.

Waterproofing requirements for doorways to decks and balconies

 A non-compliant waterproofing installation below a balcony door

Water leakage below door openings has been a source of concern for the Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC) and other state regulators for a number of years.

The Building Code of Australia’s adoption of ‘AS4654 Waterproofing membranes for external above-ground use – Part 1 Materials and Part 2 Design and installation’ means that building contractors working throughout Australia are provided with clear and consistent detailing requirements to eliminate water leakage in construction. This standard came into effect in Queensland back in May, 2013.

Heat plays havoc with building materials

Heat plays havoc with building materials

Tradespeople working in Queensland are used to the heat, although there are a few more things they need to be aware of while on worksites as summer temperatures start to rise.

High temperatures (above 30 degrees Celsius) and windy conditions can affect the application and performance of various building materials, such as concrete, primer, rendered coating, waterproofing membrane, adhesive, and grout.

Excessive heat can:

Concern over conformity of threaded cyclone rods

Cyclone rod

Building products and systems used in building work need to comply with the National Construction Code and related Australian Standards.

The Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC) has recently detected issues with the threaded rod, a material commonly used in the residential sector for providing tie-down to roof and wall frames particularly in high wind and cyclonic wind speed regions.