Tradie tips

Round two of the QBCC's educational shows hits the road

On 1 November, the QBCC is launching the second round of our 2017 educational Tradie Tours, with technical advice and legislative reforms the hot topics for discussion.

Feedback from those who attended the first round of Tradie Tours in June indicated a desire for more information on technical issues and changes within the industry.

The QBCC has listened, and the second round will feature information on a costly and common defective work complaint, the installation of timber and aluminium joinery.  

Waterproofing requirements for doorways to decks and balconies

 A non-compliant waterproofing installation below a balcony door

Water leakage below door openings has been a source of concern for the Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC) and other state regulators for a number of years.

The Building Code of Australia’s adoption of ‘AS4654 Waterproofing membranes for external above-ground use – Part 1 Materials and Part 2 Design and installation’ means that building contractors working throughout Australia are provided with clear and consistent detailing requirements to eliminate water leakage in construction. This standard came into effect in Queensland back in May, 2013.

Heat plays havoc with building materials

Heat plays havoc with building materials

Tradespeople working in Queensland are used to the heat, although there are a few more things they need to be aware of while on worksites as summer temperatures start to rise.

High temperatures (above 30 degrees Celsius) and windy conditions can affect the application and performance of various building materials, such as concrete, primer, rendered coating, waterproofing membrane, adhesive, and grout.

Excessive heat can:

Concern over conformity of threaded cyclone rods

Cyclone rod

Building products and systems used in building work need to comply with the National Construction Code and related Australian Standards.

The Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC) has recently detected issues with the threaded rod, a material commonly used in the residential sector for providing tie-down to roof and wall frames particularly in high wind and cyclonic wind speed regions.

Restraints for internal partition walls

Internal partition wall restrained at top by gun nails fired into metal ceiling batten

A recent audit of north Queensland building sites by the Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC) revealed widespread use of non-compliant practices in relation to restraints on the tops of internal partition walls.

The QBCC identified a number of builders restraining the tops of internal timber walls by firing framing nails into metal ceiling battens installed onto the underside of roof truss bottom chords.

Electrical Safety Office urges contractors to stop unsafe practices

Low powered light bulb in a darkened room

Our friends at the Electrical Safety Office have just released important information about following the correct process to disconnect electricity supply when carrying out demolition or renovation work:

Interference with the electricity distribution network

Contractors and tradespeople who disconnect electricity supply or bypass the Energex or Ergon Energy supply abolishment processes before they conduct demolition or renovation work are being urged by ESO to stop this unsafe and illegal practice before a serious incident occurs.

Update on the gun nailing of tie–down connectors

Grouping of gun nails

You may have recently received a blog from QBCC regarding the inappropriate use of gun nails in framing anchors and straps.

QBCC received a great deal of response from industry practitioners and associations.

To provide further detail and clarity about the QBCC’s requirements, the QBCC convened a forum on 16 December 2015 consisting of leading connector manufacturers (MiTek, Multinail, Pryda), truss suppliers, Building Certifiers and industry associations such as the Housing Industry Association, Master Builders Association and Timber Queensland.

Whack a cap in it

Timber decking

Our Building Inspectors see all types of timber products and applications when out and about on work sites.

It is not always widely known that certain types of timber can only be used for internal purposes, unless it is protected in some way.

Timber materials that are exposed to the elements must be installed and protected strictly in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

If timber is not installed correctly then the life of the material may be substantially reduced and the installation is considered to be defective work.

It’s time to update your advertising materials

Contractor referring to his notes

As a licensed contractor, it is important to ensure that your advertising materials are up to date.

All your advertising materials must include your QBCC licence number. Advertising can include anything from newspaper advertisements to Facebook pages and vehicle signage.

And if you are still referencing the ‘QBSA’ or ‘BSA’, it is time to update your wording so that it refers to the ‘QBCC’.    

Remember, some new home owners may not have heard of the BSA, so it is in your best interests that they know at a glance and be reassured that you are licensed with us.

Cyclone Testing Station looks for new ways of building in NQ

Lightening hitting land at night

If you’re a licensee who works in cyclone territory, you would be well aware of the devastating impact extreme weather systems can have on homes and work sites.

What you might not know is that James Cook University’s (JCU) Cyclone Testing Station is in the business of researching new and improved ways of building and rebuilding homes in North Queensland.

JCU has plenty of videos online that offer useful information and helpful tips for builders and home owners alike.

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